This just in:

Travel: Takeoffs & Landings

By Paul Glader
783 words
30 May 2003
The Wall Street Journal

Snug As a Bug?

HERE’S SOME CREEPY NEWS: Old-fashioned bedbugs are making a comeback at hotels.

The National Pest Management Association, a trade group of exterminators based in Dunn Loring, Va., has had reports of infestations from 27 states in the past three years, says Dr. Harold Harlan, a senior entomologist there, compared to a handful in the 1990s. Orkin Pest Control in Atlanta says it has treated 35 hotels for bedbugs so far this year, up from 30 in 2002 and just 10 the year earlier. At hotels in particular, the bedbug problem is “escalating big-time,” says Dr. Phil Koehler, a professor of entomology at the University of Florida, who estimates there’s been a tenfold increase since 1999 in Florida alone.
Read more…

Our movie today will be … awful

Paul Glader
Wall Street Journal
1,134 words
18 May 2003

© 2003 Chicago Sun Times. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights reserved.

Wall Street Journal

Saundra Claster loves old movies, and she remembers watching “The Pink Panther” on an airplane like it happened just yesterday. In fact, it pretty much did: She saw the 1964 movie just this year on a flight from Paris to New York.

Worse, the film was filled with scratches and pops. “I like classics,” says the 38-year-old New Yorker. “But not when they’re unwatchable.”
Read more…

Suites Get Squeezed — `Premium’ Rooms Can Be A First-Class Letdown; Tricks to Fool the Eye

By Paul Glader and Brooks Barnes
1,309 words
27 June 2003
The Wall Street Journal

(Copyright (c) 2003, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

MELISSA RUSSELL stepped expectantly into her “Spa Room” junior suite at the Bayshore Resort, on Lake Michigan’s Grand Traverse Bay — and figured she was in the wrong place. Instead of the spacious living room and bedroom she thought she’d find, there was just one 394-square-foot room with a king-size bed and desk. Her room did have a balcony and a Jacuzzi, but no couch or bathrobe. Says the Boston secretary: “I thought it would be pure luxury.”
Read more…

WWE Pins Its Hopes on `Real’ Wrestlers

By Paul Glader
1,106 words
12 September 2003
The Wall Street Journal

(Copyright (c) 2003, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

A HANDFUL of America’s best male wrestlers won’t be on the mat at the world championships of freestyle wrestling in New York’s Madison Square Garden this weekend. Instead of trying to out-grapple rivals from Cuba, Iran and Japan and earn a chance at next year’s Olympics, they’ll be in Roanoke, Va., for “Smackdown,” World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.’s testosterone-charged — and well-paying — television show.

In a development that has polarized the sport, WWE, the company that brought America Hulk Hogan and Stone Cold Steve Austin, has started head-hunting real athletes from men’s college and postcollegiate wrestling programs. As a result, several of America’s best wrestlers also won’t compete for a spot at the Olympic Games in Athens next summer.
Read more…

Steel Prices Surge, Causing Problems For Manufacturers — Companies Stockpile Goods To Head Off Volatile Market; Weak Dollar Partly to Blame

By Paul Glader
1,298 words
23 February 2004
The Wall Street Journal

(Copyright (c) 2004, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

U.S. steel prices have jumped at least 30% in less than two months and continue to rise with such frequency that suppliers can’t predict them from week to week, causing buyers to stockpile supplies, scrounge for less-expensive alternatives and look for other ways to offset rising costs.

The increase, which comes amid rising prices for many other raw materials, is causing havoc for distributors, buyers and contractors down the supply chain. It comes at a delicate time for those who buy and bend steel, from appliance makers to toolmakers to commercial construction companies, whose businesses where just beginning to pickup. With the economic recovery still uneven, many steel users find they must absorb the costs because their customers refuse to accept higher prices.
Read more…

Gene Therapy for Parkinson’s Set for Trial in U.S. This Year — Concerns About a Death In France Won’t Halt Test Researchers Claim Is Safe

By Paul Glader
689 words
14 October 2002
The Wall Street Journal Europe

(Copyright (c) 2002, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

The first clinical trials of gene therapy to treat patients with Parkinson’s disease are expected to be under way in the U.S. by the end of this year — on the heels of new fears about using genes to treat diseases.

The researchers, who will conduct the Parkinson’s trials at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Medical College of Cornell University, have a go-ahead from the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee — a U.S. National Institutes of Health review panel that oversees gene-therapy trials — as well as approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Read more…

Letting the Boss Jump-Start Your Heart — Offices, Schools Are Installing Small New Defibrillators; Bringing the Coach Back

By Paul Glader
853 words
30 October 2002
The Wall Street Journal

(Copyright (c) 2002, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

A NEW GENERATION of laptop-size defibrillators, designed to be easy enough that almost anyone can jump-start a stricken colleague’s heart, are fast becoming almost as common as fire extinguishers in office buildings, schools and airports.

But their growing presence is raising questions: Have enough people been trained to use a shock treatment that was until recently regarded as highly specialized equipment used by emergency-room doctors?
Read more…

Immelt offers mea culpa — GE chief seeks to persuade investors he’s ready to tackle new era

By Paul Glader
788 words
16 December 2009
The Wall Street Journal Asia

(c) 2009 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. To see the edition in which this article appeared, click here http://awsj.com.hk/factiva-ns

General Electric Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Jeff Immelt intended to take the “Saturday Night Live” stage at Rockefeller Center Tuesday for his annual update for investors, aiming to persuade them he can guide GE to a new era of growth despite a cloudy forecast for 2010.

In recent appearances, the 53-year-old Mr. Immelt has said he is “humbler and hungrier” because of the recent credit crisis and recession, which severely damaged GE. He has also defended his record while stressing that he has learned from his mistakes.
Read more…

Firms Move Gingerly to Rescind Salary Cuts; As Slump Eases, Some Companies Are Also Reviving Raises and Bonuses—but Not Necessarily for All

By Paul Glader
779 words
1 March 2010
The Wall Street Journal Online

Copyright 2010 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Slowly and tentatively, some companies are rescinding pay cuts made during the recession.

Hard-drive maker Seagate Technology Inc. and New York Times Co. are among the concerns restoring full salaries for some but not all employees. Hewlett-Packard Co. granted one-time bonuses after cutting pay, though it may not permanently reverse the cuts.

FedEx Corp. is resuming some raises, but from levels that were reduced by pay cuts. Computer-storage giant EMC Corp. fully restored pay in January only after monitoring financial performance for six months.
Read more…

IBM researchers claim advance in chip design

By Paul Glader and Don Clark
495 words
8 March 2010
The Wall Street Journal Europe

(Copyright (c) 2010, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

Researchers at International Business Machines Corp. are claiming an important advance that could change the way computer chips communicate, sharply boosting speed while lowering energy consumption.

The goal is to use pulses of light rather than copper wires to exchange information between chips — and to build the needed components out of silicon rather than costly, esoteric materials.
Read more…

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn